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How to Train Your Dog on a Treadmill – 7 Tips

When the weather is bad, a dog treadmill can come in rather handy for keeping your dog busy and content.

When your dog’s long walks aren’t feasible, such in the winter, they can get plenty of exercise on a dog treadmill. It’s important to gradually acclimate your dog to the treadmill. Make sure the treadmill belt is long enough for your dog’s stride in order to ensure their safety.

How to Train Your Dog on a Treadmill

Choosing a Dog Treadmill

Larger dogs frequently have far longer strides than humans, although little dogs can use a human treadmill. A dog-specific treadmill is a preferable option for these huge dogs.

Dog Training on a Treadmill

Train your dog on a treadmill gradually and with positivity. In order for your dog to exercise safely and effectively, you want her to feel at ease and at ease on the treadmill.

  1. Get comfortable stepping on and off the stationary bike. Reward your dog with goodies when she gets on the treadmill and use them to entice her to get off at any angle. This teaches her how to get off securely in case she becomes upset or exhausted later.
  2. Place some snacks next to the treadmill and turn it on low. This makes your dog identify the sound of the moving belt with good things.
  3.  Urge your dog to make contact with the moving belt. Reward her if she initially touches the belt with one paw. Work your way up to boarding the moving belt gradually and exiting it quickly in a controlled manner.
  4. Increase the length of time your dog spends walking on the moving belt gradually. To reward her, give her several goodies, but if she becomes agitated, let her go.
  5. Gradually raise the speed of the treadmill after your dog is at peace using it.

Tips for Training Dogs on a Treadmill

  • Treats and praise can help your dog come to enjoy using the treadmill.
  • For best results, work your way up to a natural trotting tempo.
  • Start off with quick sessions a few times a day and gradually extend them.
  • Short yet frequent sessions are preferable than one long session for overweight canines.
  • It can be harmful to attach your dog to a treadmill, so never do it.
  • You should never coerce your dog onto the treadmill.
  • Always keep an eye on treadmill users.

For more information about how to keep your dog healthy or how to train your dog wearing our Posh Dog Knee Brace you can contact us via our contact form or Facebook Page.


The Benefits of Therapy Dogs for Both Physical and Mental Health

Pets that support you emotionally and enhance your health are called therapy dogs. To help both yourself and other people, you can teach your dog to be a therapy dog.

Dogs used for therapy reside in homes. They can also visit a range of locations, such as schools, hospice homes, hospitals, retirement or assisted living facilities, and schools. They have been educated to tolerate being petted or hugged by strangers and to be kind and amiable. When kids pull at their fur or when grownups want the younger ones to sit on their laps, they are understanding and unfazed.

One kind of therapy animal is the therapy dog. Additional animals that can provide emotional support include horses, llamas, alpacas, cats, bunnies, and birds.

The Benefits of Therapy Dogs for Both Physical and Mental Health

Service dogs and therapy dogs

Although they’re not the same as therapy dogs, service dogs are something else entirely.

  • Service dogs –  are taught to carry out particular duties for their owners. They get demanding, upscale, goal-oriented training designed especially to support their owners in adjusting to disability. These canines are permitted to accompany their owners in public areas by laws established by the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • Therapy dogs – Some people refer to therapy dogs as “comfort dogs.” They help someone’s mental health by giving them comfort and attention. Those who deal with challenging health issues may get therapeutic benefits from their lovely dispositions and unwavering love. On the other hand, anyone can appreciate a therapy dog, unlike assistance dogs.

*The ADA does not protect therapy dogs, sometimes known as emotional support animals.
Service Animals and Emotional Support Animals, ADA National Network, 2014. They therefore lack the same rights as their owners to join them in restricted public areas unless prior authorization is granted. To offer some constructive comfort treatment, the therapy pet needs to be welcomed onto the property.

How Your Health Can Be Improved by Therapy Dogs

It is commonly recognized that therapy dogs can help with a variety of mental health issues and psychiatric problems.Interaction with therapy dogs and other companion animals is beneficial for patients with a variety of diagnoses, including depression, bipolar disorder, autism, ADHD, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and Alzheimer’s disease.

Therapy dogs can also assist with physical health issues that may be the cause of emotional difficulties. Empirical evidence indicates that individuals undergoing animal-assisted therapy may experience reduced pain during their convalescence following challenging surgery or a severe accident. According to studies, these connections can lower the stress hormone cortisol and raise the hormone that improves mood, oxytocin.

Which Dog Breeds Qualify to Be Therapy Dogs?

With a little instruction, any amiable breed of dog can become a therapy dog. Larger breeds are frequently utilized as therapy dogs, including Labradors, St. Bernards, standard poodles, and golden retrievers. On the other hand, when the patient and the dog are sharing a confined space, smaller breeds like Pomeranians and micro poodles make sense.

Although the breed may have some influence on the dog’s pleasant nature, the dog’s upbringing and even temperament development play a major role. Dogs are evaluated and studied for how they react to various stimuli, including unexpected grabs, loud or confusing noises, and even equipment like wheelchairs or canes, before they are approved as therapy animals.

Getting Your Own Therapy Dog

Many internet directories are available if you would want additional information about how to find a therapy dog to aid you or a loved one. To identify people and organizations in your area, search for “therapy dog” along with the name of your town or city online.

Do an internet search for “therapy dog training” along with the name of your town or city to find out what options are available if you’re interested in finding out more about training your dog to be a therapy dog or visiting nursing homes or other facilities with your pet. Or just contact the facility of your choice by phone or email to find out about their admission policy.

For more information about therapy or our Posh Dog Knee Brace you can contact us via our contact form or Facebook Page.


How many Hours a Day Should My Dog Wear the Brace?

Hi guys, this is Nikki Lead Veterinary Technician with Posh Dog Knee Braces, and today let’s discuss how many hours a day your dog should wear a knee brace.  Now this also really depends on what we are treating.  If we have a full CCL tear with meniscus involvement, I may suggest you use the brace more often than a patient with a partial tear. 

Also, how much energy your dog has is a big factor on how many hours you really need to be using the brace.  Some brace companies say wear the brace all day long, with no breaks.  This can lead to a lot of problems initially, if you have not properly broken in the wearing time of your brace. 

How Many Hours a Day to Wear the Brace

If you have a high energy dog, one that dives off of stairs and furniture, and is harder to control, you may be advised to use the brace a bit more.  Now, we only suggest using braces during times that your dog is supervised.  This is a medical device, and should not be worn without direct supervision.  I would suggest starting out slow, just using the brace during walks and activities hours your veterinary technician will go over with you.  Once your dog has been using the brace well, and you feel more confident, you can begin to increase the amount of time (hours) your dog uses the brace. 

I still like to give breaks during the day, especially if there is a time they like to lay down and nap.  For instance, using the brace for 2 to 3 hours in the morning, while they get the wiggles out, go potty, walk, and breakfast is perfectly fine.  You may then opt to remove the brace during lunchtime, as most dogs calm down around this time.  Then, you can place the brace back on in the afternoon, and remove prior to going to bed.  This is just a suggested scenario, but again you do need to continue monitoring them with the brace. 

We do not suggest any patient to wear the brace 8-12 hours a day, as anything that is worn that long on human or dog can cause skin irritation.

If your dog is pretty chill, relaxed, and only really active outside (such as giant breeds), then I would suggest using the brace just for activities.  These can include walks, car rides, when someone comes to visit, playing with another dog, stairs, ect.  If they spend most of their time laying down, it would not be comfortable to leave a brace on all day long.  Let them get cozy, but we will be suggesting some Physical therapy activities to help prevent atrophy.

Put a sign outside your door, this will help discourage people from ringing the doorbell or knocking.  Most dogs react to hearing a knock and doorbell, so if we can cut back on those times that will really help with preventing re-injury.  Instead, put your phone number on the sign, so they can text you if someone arrives to visit.

Always feel free to speak to your service veterinary technician with any questions, that is what we are here for!  Thank you, and give your dog a big hug for us!

You can contact us via our contact page or visit our Facebook page for more information.

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8 Activity-Related Dog Injuries

Dogs can be prone to injuries related to various physical activities. Understanding the types of injuries associated with specific activities can help dog owners take preventive measures and seek appropriate veterinary care when needed. Here are common activity-related dog injuries:

Activity-Related Dog Injuries

8 Activity-Related Dog Injuries

  1. Running and Jumping:
    1. Muscle Strains: Dogs, especially active breeds, may experience muscle strains from sudden acceleration, deceleration, or awkward landings during running or jumping activities.
  2. Agility Training:
    1. Sprains and Strains: Dogs participating in agility courses may experience sprains or strains, particularly in joints and soft tissues, due to sudden twists, turns, or jumps.
  3. Frisbee and Fetch:
    1. Soft Tissue Injuries: Overexertion during games of fetch or frisbee can lead to soft tissue injuries, including strains, sprains, or even ligament tears.
  4. Biking and Jogging:
    1. Overexertion: Long-distance running or biking can lead to overexertion, dehydration, and heat-related issues. Pay attention to your dog’s fitness level and provide water breaks.
  5. Aggressive Play with Other Dogs:
    1. Soft Tissue Injuries: Dogs engaged in rough play can sustain injuries such as bruises, muscle strains, or even more severe injuries if play becomes too aggressive.
  6. Skateboarding or Scootering:
    1. Muscle Strains and Joint Stress: Dogs engaging in activities like skateboarding or pulling scooters may experience muscle strains or stress on joints, especially if they are not conditioned for these activities.
  7. Catching Toys in the Air:
    1. Joint Injuries: Dogs that repeatedly jump to catch objects in the air may be prone to joint injuries, particularly in the hips and knees.
  8. Aggressive Ball Retrieval:
    1. Oral Injuries: Dogs that obsessively retrieve balls may wear down their teeth or suffer oral injuries. Monitor for signs of dental issues.

Preventing activity-related injuries involves being mindful of your dog’s limitations, ensuring they are adequately conditioned for the activity, and providing proper warm-up and cool-down periods. Regular veterinary check-ups can help detect and address any underlying health issues that might predispose a dog to injuries during physical activities. If an injury occurs, prompt veterinary attention is essential to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

For more information about related injuries or if you would like information about our brace contact us via our contact form or visit our Facebook page.


Break-In schedule for a Custom Posh Brace

Hello!  This is Nikki, Lead Veterinary Technician with Posh Dog Knee Braces.  Today let’s go over how to break-in a new Posh Custom Dog Brace.  First, we want to take things nice and slow.  You wouldn’t take a brand new pair of boots to Disneyland resort for 10 miles of walking each day I hope.  Neither should we put a custom brace on a dog for 8-12 hours without first working into that time.  Just like in people, a dog’s skin needs some time to get adjusted to wearing something. 

Over the next few weeks, as we gradually increase the times we have them in the brace, the skin will start to thicken and get stronger.  Just like our feet do with a new pair of shoes.  After a few short weeks, they should be able to tolerate wearing the brace longer and longer.

Break-In schedule for a Custom Posh Brace

Break-In schedule

In the first 1-2 weeks, we suggest only using the brace during short leashed walks.  This is to get your dog used to walking in the brace, to prevent soreness, and to get their skin used to having something touching.  It can take a patient sometimes up to 3-4 weeks for the soreness in the muscle to get better, just like if we did physical therapy. 

You wouldn’t want to run a 10K marathon with no practice or training, right?  Even if your dog was walking 4+ miles each day before the injury, we now have atrophy and muscle loss (yes even if its only been a few weeks).  Starting out with nice slow walks, and building up the times slowly, will really help prevent soreness and rubbing issues.

We typically don’t see rubbing sores with Posh, because we are so clear on our direction to our clients.  Wearing the brace gradually more and more each week, really helps them adapt to having something touching their sensitive areas.  The upper groin and ankle area seem to be the most common areas we see any irritation, and usually if the brace was worn for too long too fast.  Doing 10-15 minutes twice daily for 2 weeks, then adding 15 minutes weekly to their walk schedule will really help. 

We have this break-in schedule completely broken down for our clients in the handouts we send after the brace has been fit properly with a technician.  A custom brace should never be worn right off without some sort of consultation, to ensure proper fit and make sure your dog is using the brace properly.  Any company that does not do this is a red flag in my book.

Let me know if you have any questions about our break-in schedule! Please contact us via our contact page or visit our Facebook Page.

Nikki, Posh Lead Veterinary Technician


10 Tips – How to Stop a Dog From Running Out the Door

Teaching your dog to stop running out the door is essential for their safety and the safety of others. Here are some steps you can take to stop a dog from running out the door:

10 Tips-How to Stop a Dog from Running out the door

10 Tips to Train Your Dog From Running Out the Door

  1. Training with Basic Commands: Ensure your dog has a strong foundation in basic obedience commands like “sit,” “stay,” and “come.” Practice these commands regularly in various situations to reinforce their obedience.
  2. Use a Leash or Tether: Keep your dog on a leash or use a tether when near the door. This provides physical control and prevents them from running out when the door opens.
  3. Door Manners Training: Train your dog to wait at the door before exiting. Teach them to sit or stay before you open the door and release them only when you give the command. Reward them with praise or treats for waiting patiently.
  4. Create a Safe Zone: Establish a designated area away from the door where your dog can wait when visitors arrive. Use a mat or dog bed and practice “stay” in this safe zone.
  5. Ignore Excitement: If your dog gets excited when the doorbell rings or guests arrive, avoid reinforcing this behavior by not giving attention until they are calm and have followed your commands.
  6. Practice Regularly: Consistent training is key. Practice door manners and commands regularly with different family members to ensure your dog responds consistently.
  7. Manage the Environment: Prevent access to the door when you are not able to actively supervise your dog. Use baby gates or keep your dog in a separate room if necessary.
  8. Positive Reinforcement: Use positive reinforcement to reward your dog for good behavior. Offer treats, praise, or toys when they follow commands and demonstrate appropriate door manners.
  9. Desensitization: Gradually desensitize your dog to door-related triggers, such as the doorbell or knocking sounds. Practice these cues with your dog to help them become more comfortable and less reactive.
  10. Be Patient: Changing a dog’s behavior takes time and consistency. Be patient with your dog’s progress and continue practicing training regularly.

Remember that each dog is unique, and some may require more time and training than others to learn new behaviors. Positive reinforcement and patience are crucial in training your dog to stop running out the door. If you encounter challenges or your dog’s behavior does not improve, consider seeking guidance from a professional dog trainer or behaviorist for personalized assistance.

We a lot of different braces to help your dog recover from their injuries if you are intererested in learning more you can contact us via our contact page or visit our Facebook Page for more information.


How Much Exercise Do Dogs Need? – 5 Things to Know

The amount of exercise a dog needs can vary depending on factors such as their breed, age, size, and overall health. However, most dogs require a combination of physical and mental exercise to stay healthy and happy. Here are some general guidelines for the amount of exercise dogs need based on their life stage:

How Much Exercise Do Dogs Need

What Exercise for which dog age

Puppies: Puppies have boundless energy and need frequent, short bursts of play and activity throughout the day. As they grow, their activity can gradually increase. Aim for a total of 30 minutes to 2 hours of exercise daily, spread across several short play sessions.

Adult Dogs: Adult dogs generally require around 30 minutes to 2 hours of exercise each day, depending on their breed and activity level. Breeds with high energy levels, such as Border Collies or Retrievers, may need closer to 1-2 hours of activity daily, while smaller or less active breeds may be content with 30 minutes to an hour.

Senior Dogs: Older dogs may have reduced energy levels and mobility, but they still benefit from regular exercise. Lighter and shorter exercise sessions are more appropriate for seniors, typically around 30 minutes per day. Keep in mind that senior dogs may need more frequent breaks and slower-paced walks.

  1. Know Your Dog’s Breed and Individual Needs:
    • Different dog breeds have varying energy levels and exercise requirements. Research the characteristics of your dog’s breed to understand its typical energy level and activity needs. Additionally, consider your individual dog’s age, health, and temperament.
  2. Observe Your Dog’s Behavior:
    • Pay attention to your dog’s behavior to gauge if they are getting enough exercise. Signs of a well-exercised dog include contentment, a calm demeanor, and appropriate behavior indoors. On the other hand, excess energy may lead to destructive behavior, excessive barking, or restlessness.
  3. Mix Up Exercise Routines:
    • Dogs can benefit from a combination of activities. Include daily walks, playtime, and interactive games. Mixing up the routine not only provides physical exercise but also mental stimulation. Try activities like fetch, agility training, or puzzle toys to keep your dog engaged.
  4. Regular Walks:
    • Daily walks are a fundamental form of exercise for most dogs. The duration and intensity of the walk will depend on your dog’s size, breed, and health. Some dogs may need multiple short walks, while others may benefit from a longer stroll. Aim for at least 30 minutes to two hours of exercise per day, depending on your dog’s needs.
  5. Consult with Your Veterinarian:
    • Before implementing a new exercise routine or if you have concerns about your dog’s health, consult with your veterinarian. They can provide guidance based on your dog’s age, breed, and overall health. Certain health conditions or age-related issues may require adjustments to the exercise plan. Consulting with your veterinarian can also help determine the appropriate amount of exercise for your dog based on their specific breed, age, and health conditions. Tailoring the exercise routine to your dog’s individual needs will help ensure they remain healthy, happy, and well-exercised.

In addition to physical exercise, mental stimulation is crucial for all dogs, regardless of age. Mental exercises, such as puzzle toys, training sessions, and interactive games, help keep their minds sharp and prevent boredom.

Remember that these are general guidelines, and individual dogs may have different needs. It’s essential to observe your dog’s behavior and adjust their exercise routine accordingly. Some signs that your dog may need more exercise include restlessness, excessive barking, destructive behavior, or weight gain. On the other hand, if your dog appears tired, lethargic, or is experiencing difficulty exercising, consider reducing the intensity or duration of their activities.

If you have any questions you can contact us via our contact page or visit our Facebook page for more information.


Exercise and Puppies Interesting Facts You Should Know

Hey guys, this is Nikki Lead Veterinary Technician with Posh Dog Knee Braces.  Today let’s talk about exercise in our cute little furry babies that we all love!  Puppies are so cute, running around with those giant feet that don’t seem to match their bodies.  Have you noticed how puppies tend to be very clumsy?  Always falling over, tripping, slipping on hard surfaces?  We think it is cute, but did you know there is a reason?  Let’s talk about that today. 

Exercise and Puppies

Exercise and Puppies Interesting fact

Did you know that a puppies bones do not even touch when you bring home that cute little 8 week old puppy?  Their little joints are made of muscle, tendons, and ligaments with skin covering.  Nothing is fitting tightly like a true socket.  It can take 4-6 months for the joints to start developing, and 8 months and up for those growth plates to start to fuse.  Some large breeds take 15+ months for their growth plates to finish.  What does this mean?

This means that we have to be very careful as to not run a young dog excessively.  This means restricting and supervising your puppy’s exercise, to stop them from being over-active.  Each time they have a big jump, or an excessive run, this causes impacts between the bones.  In a reasonable amount this is not a big deal, and is completely normal play.  However, if you are letting your puppy jump up and down off furniture, taking them on long walks and hikes, you can potentially be damaging those forming joints, and this could cost you in the near future.

You see that puppy scrambling on the tile with no traction, and think it is a funny tik tok video, right?  This is actually damaging their joints.  Puppies need traction.  Sliding into things, and scrambling, is not normal for a dog.  Think about their wild ancestors, do you think their pups are walking on tile and sliding all the time?  Nope!  Neither should our pups.  Every time that pup does the splits, you risk tearing the tendons in the hip.  These can not be fixed. 

There are far too many puppies having an FHO (where they have to remove the femoral head) due to slipping on surfaces.  Either get your puppy toe grips, or have runners all over for them not to slip and slide.

You only have one chance to let your puppy grow in a healthy way.  Once grown, you will have a lifetime to spend playing and engaging them, showing them, doing activities.  So, keep it calm while they are still growing, engage them in fun safe activities.  Taking them to puppy school is a great way to bond and get the wiggles out.  Teach them commands and how to walk on a leash.

Puppies who are much to active have much higher chance of developing osteoarthritis, ligament tears like the CCL, patella issues, hip injuries and issues, and much more.  I am not saying you can’t play with your puppy, but taking a 4 month old on a mountain hike is too much.  Learn about what they should be developmentally doing at this age.  Ask your Veterinarian or staff for help.  Feel free to email us with any questions, we give free consults you can contact us via contact form on our website or visit our Facebook Page for more information.

Improve his life and yours with our custom crafted dog knee brace. It’s much more effective than a ready to wear or a soft dog ccl brace.Order yours today at Posh Dog Knee Brace or call us at 509-412-3065.


10 Benefits of Rehabilitation Therapy for Dogs

Rehabilitation therapy, also known as physical therapy or physiotherapy for dogs, offers a wide range of benefits that can significantly improve their overall health, mobility, and quality of life. It is especially beneficial for dogs recovering from injuries, surgeries, or managing chronic conditions.

Rehabilitation therapy, also known as physical therapy or physiotherapy for dogs, offers a wide range of benefits that can significantly improve their overall health, mobility, and quality of life. It is especially beneficial for dogs recovering from injuries, surgeries, or managing chronic conditions. Here are some of the key benefits of rehabilitation therapy for dogs:

Here are some of the key benefits of rehabilitation therapy for dogs:

  1. Pain Management: Rehabilitation therapy can help alleviate pain and discomfort in dogs. Therapeutic techniques such as massage, heat therapy, cold therapy, and laser therapy can target pain and inflammation, providing relief for various conditions, including arthritis, joint issues, and muscle strains.
  2. Improved Mobility: For dogs with mobility issues due to injuries or age-related conditions, rehabilitation therapy focuses on restoring joint flexibility, muscle strength, and coordination. Physical exercises, balance training, and hydrotherapy can improve gait and overall mobility.
  3. Faster Recovery from Injuries and Surgeries: Rehabilitation therapy plays a crucial role in the post-operative recovery process. It helps dogs regain strength, reduce scar tissue, and improve joint function after surgeries, such as orthopedic procedures.
  4. Preventing Muscle Atrophy: When dogs have limited mobility or are recovering from injuries, muscle atrophy can occur. Rehabilitation therapy employs targeted exercises to prevent muscle wasting and maintain muscle mass and strength.
  5. Weight Management: Obesity can exacerbate various health conditions in dogs, including joint problems. Rehabilitation therapists can design exercise and diet plans to help dogs reach and maintain a healthy weight, reducing stress on their joints.
  6. Enhanced Posture and Body Awareness: Rehabilitation therapy includes exercises to improve posture and body awareness. This can help dogs develop proper movement patterns, reducing the risk of injury and improving their overall coordination.
  7. Stimulation and Mental Enrichment: The therapy sessions can be mentally stimulating for dogs, providing them with a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction as they complete various exercises and tasks.
  8. Non-Invasive Treatment Options: Rehabilitation therapy focuses on non-invasive techniques, avoiding the need for extensive medications or surgical interventions, whenever possible.
  9. Improved Quality of Life: By addressing pain, mobility issues, and promoting overall well-being, rehabilitation therapy enhances a dog’s quality of life, allowing them to enjoy a more active and comfortable lifestyle.
  10. Tailored Treatment Plans: Each dog’s rehabilitation plan is tailored to their specific needs, taking into account their age, condition, and individual limitations. This personalized approach ensures that the therapy is effective and safe.

Rehabilitation therapy for dogs is typically provided by licensed veterinary professionals, such as certified canine rehabilitation therapists (CCRT) or veterinarians with specialized training in physical therapy. If you believe your dog could benefit from rehabilitation therapy, consult with your veterinarian to discuss the best options for your dog’s specific condition and needs.

If you are interested in a Posh Dog Knee Brace visit our store page to purchase and if you need more information or would like to keep up to date on new things with Posh Dog Knee Brace visit our Facebook page.


Is it a Good Idea to Hand-Feed Your Dog?

There are many advantages to hand-feed your dog or puppy, and there are only a few circumstances in which it’s not a good idea.

Many dog trainers hand-feed their dogs their meals throughout the day rather than feeding them from a bowl for the most of the day. Every encounter with a dog is a chance to train them. Along with catching your dog in the act of being good, setting aside a portion (or all!) of your dog’s morning and evening meals and hand delivering that food as needed throughout the day will help you increase your rate of reinforcement and create value for the behaviors you want to see more of. A puppy can continuously practice basic behaviors like sit, down, wait, come, and other polite expressions by being hand-fed.

Additionally, hand-feeding for a while can assist raise the dog’s attention on you as the handler by linking you with meals and feeding, which can help dogs who are usually confident but who have many interests, of which you are just one, or dogs who are easily distracted, pay more attention to you.

Hand-feeding can enable you and a new dog or dog and a new person in your life get to know one another.

When is it not a good idea to feed by hand?

While hand-feeding a dog can help build a relationship with them, it can also increase stress if the dog is extremely timid or scared. Similar to people, some individuals would try to bribe a timid dog with food or treats to make him more comfortable among strangers. However, what frequently occurs (especially with dogs who really enjoy food) is that the allure of the food temporarily overrides their unease about the person – but only for as long as it takes to grab the food. The intention is for the dog to associate the presence of the “scary person” (“Yikes!”) with the presence of the food (“Yum!”).

They immediately realize the “scary person” is too close for comfort once the meal is in their mouth. In this instance, the food serves less as a tool to assist in changing the dog’s relationship and more as a trap.

When dealing with the “strangers are scary” issue, it is preferable for the owner to provide meals while the “scary person” is visible but sufficiently enough away to not raise any serious concerns. If you’re trying to bond with a dog who is really timid, adopt a similar strategy by staying close enough to him so that he identifies your presence with the food, but not so close that it requires a lot of bravery (or desperation) to eat it.

What to look out for when feeding a dog by hand

Hand-feeding certain dogs may make them more reckless with food. In an effort to acquire the food, many dogs become too excited and may jump up or lunge at their owners’ hands. Asking your dog to sit while you hold a piece of cheap food in your open palm will assist you teach impulse control in this situation. Try to bring your palm up near your dog. If he approaches the meal, clench your fist and, if necessary, ask him to sit down once more. Use your opposite hand to carry food to your dog’s mouth and command him to “take it!” as soon as he can control himself as your food hand approaches.

For some dogs, “self-control” will look differently. In the beginning, self-control may require a dog who is very excited to maintain a sit position for two seconds with your open hand 12 inches above her head. If your dog has a tendency to leap up on you when you are holding food, tether her with a leash to a solid object and stand just beyond the end of the leash. Your dog will eventually figure out that being patient in the vicinity of the food is the fastest way to receive it.

Try these suggestions if your dog bites down on food from your hand too forcefully.

What about dogs that require hand-feeding in order to eat?

A dog may become averse to eating from a dish in specific situations if it is fed by hand frequently. A little “tough love” could be necessary in such circumstances. Give your dog five minutes to finish his meal after placing it in a bowl. Attempt again later if he doesn’t, then take up the bowl. When food is present, a healthy dog won’t starve himself, even if using this method necessitates skipping a few meals while he waits to see if you’ll resume hand feeding.

If you are interested in a Posh Dog Knee Brace or have any questions about our braces you can contact via our contact page or visit our Facebook Page for more information.


How to Slow a Dog’s Eating: Tips & Tricks

The health of the dog depends on the owner’s ability to slow the dog’s eating.

Most dogs enjoy eating. Some dogs seem to devour their meal faster than we can blink since they adore it so much! Dogs who consume food too quickly may get sick, especially if they also take in a lot of air and develop the potentially lethal illness known as bloat. Anyone who has had their dog go through this disease understands how crucial it is to train them to eat more slowly.

Some dogs consume food so quickly that their systems can’t keep up with it; the food never even reaches the point of digestion. The end consequence is food regurgitation, which happens when food is ingested and then immediately comes back out of the mouth as a result of the esophagus’ muscles contracting backward. Food was never even consumed by the stomach. In these situations, it is advised to reduce the dog’s food intake.

dog-eating-slow

There are various effective methods you may use to simply get a dog or puppy to eat more slowly:

  • Feed more regularly throughout the day with smaller meals. An owner or a timed automatic food dispenser can dispense the food as needed.
  • The bottom of slow feeding bowls is built with upward protrusions to deter dogs from scooping up big mouthfuls of food at once. Only a limited amount of kibble can be picked up at once using these particular plates. Separating the kibble in a bigger dish, such as a cafeteria tray, or placing the food in the wells of a muffin pan, can be a strategy akin to slow eating. You can give the kibble some water to make it float, or you can put clean, substantial things in the food bowl that are too big for the dog to swallow or even put in his mouth, such tennis balls or rocks, so he has to maneuver them to get to the food.
  • There are various food-dispensing toys available, and the majority of them work with the kibble you typically serve at meals. These gadgets also have the advantage of consuming some energy simultaneously. Some toys that dispense food can handle dry food, wet food, or both. Naturally, keep them clean.
  • Consider getting a lick mat if your dog eats canned food. These silicone mats have ridges or nubs in a raised design. As opposed to gulping down mouthfuls at a time, your dog will have to suck the moist food out of the mat’s crevices and nooks.
  • You can extend mealtime even longer by freezing a wet food-dispensing toy or lick mat.

Consult your dog’s veterinarian if you’ve tried these remedies and your dog is still vomiting or regurgitating food to rule out a more serious problem.

You can always reach us on our contact page or check out our Facebook Page for information on our brace and more.


What can I be doing along with bracing to help my dog recover?

Hey guys, Nikki with posh dog knee braces here.  So, first of all I can’t stress enough the need to do some form of physical therapy.  We send every patient home with a 12 week recovery calendar and exercises, however, we need you to keep those up for the full 9 months.  Whether you find a holistic or physical therapy clinic to help you with water treadmill or PT, you need to keep you dog active in some way. 

Lack of activity will cause a joint to “lock up” after the scar tissue has formed, meaning there is not going to be the same amount of range of motion there.  There also can be loss of muscle.  The brace alone is not enough to build muscle, you will need to keep walking your dog, and doing some form of exercise program.  This is needed whether you do surgery, Conservative management, or bracing.  Doing nothing will result in loss of muscle, loss of range of motion, and most likely arthritis and pain down the road.

We have a lovely list of holistic veterinarians and rehab clinics around the US and in Canada, so reach out if you are struggling to find a clinic.  The clinics on our list are partners with posh, and know how to treat our patients, as well as measure and fit the brace if needed.  We do have some things we can have you do from home as well, if PT is just not in the budget.  I am happy with walks, simple exercises, and passive range of motion.

What is PROM?  This is you gently bending and flexing the knee, as well as the hip.  I have videos we send to you on how to do this stretching, but this is key to keep flexibility in the joint, and not end up with lack of movement there.

Please let us know if you have any questions, poshdogkneebrace.com or visit our Facebook Page.  Thanks!


What Dog Treats are Best for my Dog

Hey guys, this is Nikki Lead Veterinary technician with posh.  Today let’s talk about dog treats.  I have so many clients that are taking charge of what their dog is eating, and I want to elaborate a bit on that.  In my other blog, we discussed the importance of finding a food that is without corn, wheat, and soy, and finding a good protein as the first ingredient.  Some will even go as far as raw feeding, and that is great for those that have the time! 

So, you have done all this research, found a dog food that fits your dog’s healthy lifestyle, but they are still showing signs of skin issues, obesity, and inflammation?  This means it is time to find out exactly what goes into your dog’s mouth each day, you will actually be surprised how many treats and things your dog actually gets per day.

dog-treats

How to use your dog treats for your dog

First off, start by placing a treat inside a bag for every treat you give your dog.  If you give them a milk bone for example, you put one into the bag as well.  At the end of the day, take note of what you gave your dog, plus what treats you used. 

You will be amazed how many people don’t think about dog treats, and are spending literally hundreds of dollars every month on good quality dog food.  Yet, after just one milk bone, you have basically undone all of the good you were doing.  Did you know the main ingredient in common dog treats is wheat?  That is the first ingredient.  The second is some kind of by product, then corn, and so on. 

Do you see the problem?  Dog’s can’t digest wheat and corn well, and they can cause all sorts of issues with their digestive system.  So, please stop giving milk bones to your dog if they have any injuries, itchy skin, or you are trying to get them to loose weight.

Now I am not telling you to stop giving dog treats, not at all!  My sweet girl gets her treats daily, but we give her healthy treats, and are more aware of what she gets.  Probiotic treats are great!  My all time favorite is freeze dried treats.  They are a bit more costly than milk bones, but only have one ingredient!  Beef liver, or chicken, lamb, even bison if your dog is food protein sensitive. 

So, please look into freeze dried treats, sweet potato, cooked vegetables, or some cooked chicken instead of grabbing those milk bones!  Please let me know if you have any other questions!  You can reach me at poshintake1@gmail.com , poshdogkneebrace.com or visit our Facebook Page.


Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs:  4 Options

Hey guys, this is Nikki Lead Veterinary Technician with Posh Dog Knee Braces.  Today, let’s talk about Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair (CCL/ACL) tears in a dog, and what your options are.  First of all, if your dog is limping on the hind leg, be sure to get a diagnosis from your veterinarian before making any decisions.  Once that takes place, be firm with your Veterinarian if needed and ask for the exact diagnosis.  If they feel that your dog has a Cranial Cruciate Ligament tear, or CCL tear, then you do have some decisions to make moving forward.  Let’s go into the options, and the pros and cons, as well as long term expectations.

First off, depending on your veterinarian, they may refer you to a specialist to verify the diagnosis.  This is completely up to you, but do know that if you go to a specialist, they are typically surgeons, and will not be happy without scheduling your dog for surgery.  Please know that you can say no.  I can’t stress enough how important it is for you to take a breath, and go over all options before signing that dotted line. 

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs Option 1: 

Choosing to do just conservative management, with no support or surgery.  This seems to be gaining momentum and popularity, because obviously options can cost money.  There are supportive things to do, such as keeping your dog in a kennel, leash walks outside, supplements, acupuncture, laser, prp, ect.  While this option is better for the budget, it is not for the busy owner, or owners with small children and other pets.  While it sounds great, reality is that there is a great chance your pup will continue to re-injure their knee.  At some point, the door will open, and your dog will want to run. 

Someone will forget, your dog looks like he is dong better at 3 months, and in he comes with the leg hiked all the way up to the groin.  Sound familiar?  This can be a tough cycle, and the bones in the knee are still able to move, causing pressure on the meniscus as well increasing your dog’s chance of arthritis down the road.  So, can a knee heal with conservative management alone?  Possibly, but there could be long term issues if you do not do passive range of motion, PT, and exercising along with CM alone.

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs Option 2: 

This is by far my favorite option, from years of experience working with orthopedics.  Using an orthotic Brace in conjunction with PROM and PT, as well as supplements and support.  Now I am not talking about the cheap over the counter neoprene braces that have a spiderweb of straps connecting to the harness or back, those are no better than just letting the knee recover alone. 

I am talking about a custom made premium orthotic brace, such as the Posh Dog Knee Brace.  Posh Brace fully stabilizes the knee, allowing for range of motion and squatting, while also acting as a shock absorber for the meniscus.  This is going to help give a smoother recovery, and allow that scar tissue to form without a lot of re-injuries.  Thus, this is one of the safer options, and definitely still less than surgery.

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs Option 3:

Tightrope, lateral suture, or extracapsular repair.  This is the cheapest of the surgical options, and should only be used on patients under 30-40lbs, as the suture has double the chance of failing in larger breed patients.  This method usually is in the $2k-$3k ballpark range now, and is literally using fishing line/or suture to wrap around the knee joint to keep things in place.  There are several ways this can and usually does fail.  The crimps can come off, the suture can break, the suture can slip, ect. 

These patients are immobile for months, and do get a lot of atrophy in the joint.  This seems to be sore to recover from, and without a brace post op, your dog is going to need to be kenneled for weeks to months, to allow for scar tissue to properly form.  This technique is similar to if you braced, however, without the full stabilization and support, and double the cost.

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs Option 4:

 TPLO or TTA surgery.  Both of these will be suggested by your vet or surgeon, usually first.  They both entail cutting of the tibia bone, and re-alignment using a plate and screws.  This is permanent, and there is no going back if something doesn’t go the way it was meant to.  I always save this for my last option, as it is extremely invasive, expensive, and does not give a guarantee of working.  Too many patients have had lifelong lameness due to choosing this option, and are not able to recover fully. 

There are many weeks needed for kenneling, so the leg will atrophy.  This also causes overcompensating on the good knee, which again increases the chances of another CCL tear in that leg.  If surgery does go well, and you are able to do a full Physical Therapy Program post op with a professional, your dog may have a good outcome, but this is not without risk.

Please email me at poshintake1@gmail.com if you would like to ask more questions about Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair, CCL/ACL tears in dogs, and what the best options are for your pup.  You can also contact via our forms or visit our Facebook page.


4 Tips on How to Exercise your Dog Using Our Brace

How to exercise your dog using our brace. Hey guys, this is Nikki Lead Veterinary Technician with Posh Dog Knee Braces,we are going to talk about excerises for your dog.  Today let’s talk about how to keep your injured dog active using our brace and how to exercise with it.  As you know, after surgery there is several weeks that you would need to have your dog kenneled with no exercising, leading to atrophy of the muscles and overcompensating on the other joints.  With our brace, patients are able to fully weight bear and start walks right away, decreasing the chances for overcompensating. 

exercise your dog

Tips to Exercise your dog

Just like us, we want to start out slowly, so as not to over-use those muscles that have been unused since the onset of the injury.  I suggest starting out with no more than 2 fifteen minute walks per day for excerising, and gradually increasing the amount of walking each week by about 10-15 minutes, as the patient starts getting stronger.  Each patient is different in the amount you are able to start walks, and there may be some initial soreness for the first 2 weeks.  This will go away as we start gaining muscle back.

Once our patients are able to walk comfortably for at least 20-30 minutes, after a few weeks, we can start encouraging things like swimming, hills, beach walking, and curbwork for exercises.  Swimming can be at a physical therapy clinic, swimming pool, or a beach.  Just no jumping into the water and climbing yet.  Short hills and small hikes are great tools to keep those muscles working out.

We do offer a 12 week physical therapy program with each of our patients, which includes stretches and different exercises, such as figure 8’s, curb work, walks, hydrotherapy, ect.  It is important to keep up with passive range of motion as you work into more activities, to prevent soreness and stiffness in the muscles and joints.  As we are developing scar tissue, we want to keep up with gentle movements in the knee.  This is important to help the development of healthy scar tissues.

After a few months, gentle trots and increased activities will be ok, as long as the patient is supervised.  As we start to approach the 6-9 month mark, there should be more and more stability to the joint, even without the brace on.  As the knee begins to stabilize, we can do more and more activities.  We still need to refrain from excessive running, jumping, twisting, or playing fetch until things are fully recovered.  This is usually after about 12 months.  Always ask our technicians if you have any questions on activities planned. 

For more information about how to exercise your dog you can contact through our contact form or visit or Facebook Page.


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